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REDUCING EMISSIONS FROM DEFORESTATION AND DEGRADATION:
A PRIMER FOR THE ISLAND – BASED PLANNING COMMUNITY


Nathan Rogers
Laboratory for Housing and Human Settlement, Department of Architecture, Institute of Technology Sepuluh Nopember, Surabaya, Indonesia
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ABSTRACT

As evidenced by extreme recent weather-events worldwide, the effects of climate change seem to be increasing in severity, the causes of which are multitudinous. Of these, growing attention is being paid to emissions from tropical deforestation, which accounts for 12 to 18 percent of total greenhouse gas emissions. Reducing such emissions by paying tropical developing countries for avoided deforestation is thought to be one of the most cost-effective means of achieving emission reduction goals, and a framework for doing is beginning to coalesce: REDD.

Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation was originally proposed at the Conference of Parties 11 in Montreal, though its roots trace back to the Kyoto Protocol. While implementation of REDD on a worldwide scale still hinges on its inclusion into a post-Kyoto climate change framework, bi-lateral deals are being signed at a furious pace with roughly USD 3 billion having already been dedicated to REDD pilot projects and capacity building, much of which slated for such activities in Indonesia.

But crucial questions about REDD architecture remain, including issues of baseline setting, financing, opportunity cost, and the rights of indigenous people, among others. Furthermore, REDD discussion largely has up until now largely been the purview of climate change and forest-ecology literature. It is the aim of this paper to introduce the central concepts of REDD to the island-based planning community, who will soon have to confront the promises and perils of REDD as a potential economic development strategy.

Keywords: island, deforestation, degradation, development, community planning